Version: July, 2014 Professional Development 2 – Analysis and Strategy BFP2100 Year 2014 Semester 2. 1 answer below »

Version: July, 2014 Professional Development 2 – Analysis and Strategy BFP2100 Year 2014 Semester 2 TRI – VU-Sydney Prepared by Dr. Samuel Belicka BFP2100_S2_2014_Unit_Guide_Sydney_3July2014.doc 2 VICTORIA UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF BUSINESS PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT UNIT YEAR 2014 SEMESTER Two TRI UNIT TITLE Professional Development Two (PD2) – Analysis and Strategy UNIT CODE BFP2100 PRE-REQUISITES Successful completion of BFP1100 – Professional Development One (PD1), Critical Thinking and Problem Solving CREDIT POINTS 12 points MODE OF DELIVERY On-campus UNIT COORDINATOR Samuel Belicka Samuel.Belicka@vu.edu.au Tel: +61 3 9919 5251 LOCATION VU-Sydney – Australia VU-SYDNEY LECTURERS Sevasti Tsipidis John Corrigan Sevasti.Tsipidis@vusydney.edu.au John.Corrigan@vusydney.edu.au DESCRIPTOR Professional Development Two (PD2), the second of three units that focus on the professional development of students, will enable students to further develop the knowledge and skills gained in the first professional development unit of study BFP1100 – Professional Development One (PD1). Students will gather and evaluate business information in conditions of uncertainty to help inform effective business decision making. Students will continue to develop teamwork skills and critically evaluate their own technical and generic skills, enabling them to identify strategies for career planning and life-long learning. PD2 is based on an action learning model which aims to develop students’ skills in critical thinking, problem solving and collaborative working through group and teamwork, interactive class-based activities, team-based projects and a case study approach to business issues. Students in this unit are expected to work in diverse team environments, while developing beneficial lifelong skills such as organisational skills, conflict management skills, problem solving skills, research skills and communication skills. PD2 embraces a multidisciplinary approach to teaching and learning. The main purpose of PD2 is twofold: firstly for students to develop career portfolios, and secondly for students to develop business concept proposals and business plans. The student career portfolio involves designing their career plan, CV and a professional ePortfolio presentation which can be used for marketing student’s skills and abilities to potential employers. Developing their business concept proposals and business plans gives students the opportunity to create their own unique entrepreneurial ideas, apply their learning in other business units to a practical business problem and sell their proposal to decision makers in a highly competitive business environment. Students are expected to utilise knowledge from a broad range of other discipline areas including business analysis and management, operation management, project management, business economics, marketing, human resource management, accounting, finance, business law, information technology, business ethics and corporate social responsibility (CSR). BFP2100_S2_2014_Unit_Guide_Sydney_3July2014.doc 3 LEARNING OUTCOMES On completion of the unit, students should be able to: 1. Assess opportunities in a changing business environment; 2. Gather, collate and evaluate information to support decision making; 3. Utilise information to formulate possible solutions to business problems; 4. Prepare and present a business case; 5. Develop and document a business plan; 6. Apply business and academic research skills; 7. Manage team dynamics and be an effective team member; 8. Understand the skills and attributes of a business professional; 9. Develop their own CV, Career Plan, ePortfolio presentation of personal skills and experiences; 10. Develop and present effective oral presentations LEARNING IN THE WORK PLACE 70% of the assessment in this Unit of Study will relate to learning in the workplace. Team based learning in the workplace activities that will be included in this Unit of Study are: – Business Concept Proposal – Oral Presentation – Business Concept Proposal – Oral Project Reports – Business Plan TEACHING & LEARNING STRATEGIES This Unit of Study will be delivered as a 3 hour seminar per week. Please Note: It is expected that students will spend at least ten (10) hours per week studying this Unit of Study (including lecture and tutorial time). This time should be made up of reading, research, working on exercises and group work. In periods where you need to complete assignments or prepare for tests, the workload may be greater. These include: 1. Read/Research all prescribed and recommended readings before the assigned weekly seminar. This is critical because seminar activities assume this prior knowledge and context. 2. Reflect on previous seminar reading and learning activities and how they connect to the current weekly seminar reading and activities and to your own learning and professional development. 3. Plan Ahead: having completed the pre-reading for the weekly seminar review the activities for the upcoming weekly seminar in advance. 4. Participate and collaborate fully in in-seminar individual and team activities, and in ‘VU Collaborate’ activities and on line discussion forums. GRADUATE CAPABILITIES Victoria University’s graduate capabilities are generic skills that all students should possess at graduation. These skills are in addition to the specific knowledge and skills associated with the discipline area of students’ degrees. Graduate capabilities are divided into six levels (for undergraduates) and will be achieved progressively with increasing levels of sophistication. A full description of the graduate capabilities can be found in the VU Graduate BFP2100_S2_2014_Unit_Guide_Sydney_3July2014.doc 4 Capabilities policy pp. 7-8. This unit of study contributes to development of these graduate capabilities in a number of ways. Table 1 below offers examples of how the teaching and learning activities in this unit and the assessment tasks correspond to each graduate capability. It can be seen from Table 1 below that each of the graduate capabilities is the focus of at least one assessment task. Table 1: Unit of Study Graduate Capabilities Graduate Capability Level Description of Graduate Capability* Related Assessment Tasks 1. Problem solve in a range of settings 4 Identify and solve complex problems, selecting from a range of strategies and drawing on broad knowledge and skills. Assessment tasks: 1,2,3 2. Locate, critically evaluate, manage and use written, numerical and electronic information 3 Find, organise, evaluate and synthesise information on a broad range of topics for defined purposes. Assessment tasks: 1,2,3, 3. Communicate in a variety of contexts and modes 4 Communicate with others, using oral, written and visual techniques, on a broad range of topics using appropriate language and demonstrating significant control over key genres/text types. Assessment tasks: 1,2,3 4. Work both autonomously and collaboratively 3 Work individually, and/or with others, as both a team member and group leader, to complete tasks and evaluate own and others’ performance using given parameters. Assessment tasks: 1,2,3 5. Work in an environmentally, socially and culturally responsible manner 2 Demonstrate awareness of environmental, social and cultural perspectives that impact on work, community and learning contexts. Assessment tasks: 2,3 6. Manage learning and career development opportunities 2 Demonstrate a capacity to link own learning to career goals. Assessment task: 1 BFP2100_S2_2014_Unit_Guide_Sydney_3July2014.doc 5 ASSESSMENT The assessment scheme has 5 components as listed below: Assessment Weight Learning Outcome Format LiWC Graduate Capabilities Due Date (1) My ePortfolio – presentation 30% 2, 6, 8, 9 Multimedia presentation (individual) • Locate, critically evaluate, manage and use written, numerical and electronic information • Communicate in a variety of contexts and modes • Manage learning and career development opportunities Week 5 (2A) Business Concept Proposal 15% 1, 2, 3, 4,6, 7, 8 Report (team) Simulated business context • Problem solve in a range of settings • Locate, critically evaluate, manage and use written, numerical and electronic information • Communicate in a variety of contexts and modes • Work both autonomously and collaboratively • Work in an environmentally, socially and culturally responsible manner Week 8 (2B) Oral Presentation – Business Concept Proposal 10% 3, 4, 7, 8, 10 Oral presentation (team) Simulated business context • Locate, critically evaluate, manage and use written, numerical and electronic information • Communicate in a variety of contexts and modes • Work both autonomously and collaboratively • Work in an environmentally, socially and culturally responsible manner Week 8 (3A) Oral Project Reports 20% 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 10 Oral presentation (team) Simulated business context • Problem solve in a range of settings • Locate, critically evaluate, manage and use written, numerical and electronic information • Communicate in a variety of contexts and modes • Work both autonomously and collaboratively • Work in an environmentally, socially and culturally responsible manner Week 4, 6, 9, 10, 12 (3B) Business Plan 25% 1, 2, 3, 4,5, 6, 7, 8 Report (team) Simulated business context • Problem solve in a range of settings • Locate, critically evaluate, manage and use written, numerical and electronic information • Communicate in a variety of contexts and modes • Work both autonomously and collaboratively • Work in an environmentally, socially and culturally responsible manner Week 12 GRADE SETS There are five grade sets, namely Fail (N: 0-49%), Pass (P: 50-59%), Credit (C: 60-69%), Distinction (D: 70-79%), and High Distinction (HD: 80-100%). BFP2100_S2_2014_Unit_Guide_Sydney_3July2014.doc 6 UNIT RESULTS AND MODERATION During the semester, lecturers will add marks into Grades in ‘VU Collaborate’. The marks however are not official results as these marks are subject to review and analysis at the end of the semester. Following statistical analysis of results, there may be some minor moderation of the final results in the interests of fairness to all students. Moderation may occur where the average and spread of the marks submitted by a facilitator were significantly above or below the average and spread of marks for all students attending at all campuses. SPECIAL CONSIDERATION If you are not able to submit your work by the extended submission date, and there are valid grounds (i.e. medical, personal hardship or other extenuating circumstances) for not doing so, you can apply for Special Consideration. Contact your Unit of Study co-ordinator Work submitted after the due date, without an extension granted or the relevant documentation provided, will be recorded as being submitted but may attract significant penalties and extreme cases a zero grade. This procedure applies to both individual and group assignments. REQUIRED READING • Fogler, HS & LeBlanc, SE 2008 Strategies for Creative Problem Solving, 2nd ed. Pearson Education Inc., Upper Saddle River. • Kerzner, Harold 2010, Project Management, Best Practices [electronic resource]: Achieving Global Excellence, Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons, New York: International Institute of Learning. (E-book available to read online through VU Library) • Students are expected to read the weekly readings and resources available through ‘VU Collaborate’ BFP2100 – Professional Development 2 before each seminar. RECOMMENDED READING THAT WILL ASSIST WITH WRITTEN SUBMISSIONS & ORAL PRESENTATIONS • Anderson, T 2008, UTS Program – Guide to Project Management, University of Technology, Sydney • Heagney, Joseph 2011, Fundamentals of Project Management, E-book, Ney York: AMACOM. (E-book available to read online through VU Library) • Lientz, Bennet Rea 2012, Project Management for the 21st Century, E-book, Hoboken: Taylor & Francis. (E-book available to read online through VU Library) • Maley, Claude H 2011, Management Concepts, Methods, and Techniques, E-book, Hoboken: CRC Press. (E-book available to read online through VU Library) • O'Connell, Fergus 2012, What You Need to Know about Project Management, E-book, Caspstone, Oxford: John Wiley & Sons. (E-book available to read online through VU Library) • Scott, J T 2010, The Sustainable Business, European Foundation of Management Development, Belgium, viewed 23 September 2010, BFP2100_S2_2014_Unit_Guide_Sydney_3July2014.doc 7 • Summers, J. & Smith, B. 2006, Communication Skills Handbook, 2nd ed., John Wiley & Sons, Milton. • Victoria University 2012, Harvard: In-text & Reference List Examples, Victoria University, Melbourne, viewed 30 October 2012, . ADDITIONAL REFERENCES Activities in each week of study refer to a variety of readings and other resources available online through the unit’s weekly outlines in ‘VU Collaborate’, through the university library’s e-Reserve facility or contained in the Unit Resources Manual. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ACCOUNT VU Email: Students must be registered to use the electronic VU email system. Email access will be needed for communication with the lecturer. Important: Please note that for all communication between yourself and your lecturer, you must use your VU student email. Emails sent from non-VU email system will not be responded to. MYVU PORTAL: Students must be registered to use MYVU Student Portal which is essential to access ‘VU Collaborate’ and My ePortfolio. • My ePortfolio will be used for an individual assessment (development of a Career ePortfolio presentation). Access Problems: Contact Information Technology (IT) Services Helpdesk for all access problems on +61 9919 2777 or email: servicedesk@vu.edu.au BFP2100_S2_2014_Unit_Guide_Sydney_3July2014.doc 8 TEACHING SCHEDULE The following is provided as a guide only and may be subject to change during the semester. Refer to ‘VU Collaborate’ for full details of activities, required reading and additional resources. WEEK 1: commencing 28th of July 2014 What is PD2 all about? Graduate Capabilities and ePortfolio presentation Activities will focus on: • How will PD2 be different from PD1? Why will we need to be here each week? What professional and personal skills will we be developing in this unit? • Examination of the unit outline and the assessment requirements; • What employers are looking for in graduates & graduate capabilities; employability skills; • ePortfolio presentation as a way to showcase your professional and personal skills in the context of graduate opportunities and employer expectations; • Using My ePortfolio presentation for marketing your skills, knowledge, experiences and attributes to the potential employers; WEEK 2: commencing 4th of August 2014 Career Plan and Lifelong Learning Activities and readings will focus on: • Personal career SWOT analysis • Individual perception of career; • Evaluating technical & generic skills; • Lifelong Learning concepts & impacts; • Developing and reviewing a career plan (learning plan; balance & rewards; life goals); • Examples of CVs & what to include & what not to include; review of Careers Unit guide; • Review progress on My ePortfolio presentation; WEEK 3: commencing 11th of August 2014 Key concepts for the team projects Activities will focus on: • Team formation and team meetings to discuss the team based project and commence research for the week 2 presentation: Assessment 3A (1). • Background for the project and key concepts: corporate social responsibility (CSR); seed funding; ethics; team management; • How organisations approach their corporate responsibility and how they manage the balance between profitability and corporate social responsibility (CSR), drawing on CSR articles and organisation websites. • Problem solving techniques – mind mapping & Duncker diagram relating to chosen organisation, their stakeholders and problems that could be addressed via a CSR initiative. BFP2100_S2_2014_Unit_Guide_Sydney_3July2014.doc 9 WEEK 4: commencing 18th of August 2014 Assessment 3A: (1) ORAL PROJECT REPORT DUE Team based projects & starting the business concept proposal Activities and readings will focus on: • Assessment 3A (1) 5 min Oral Project report. • Developing entrepreneurial responses to changing markets, and customer and community expectations • Business Decision Making – finding and using multiple resources on business planning • Different approaches to developing a business plan; key elements of a business plan • How to write clear and measurable aims and objectives using SMART criteria • Individuals showcasing My ePortfolio presentation to class & discuss how to share with lecturer electronically WEEK 5: commencing 25th of August 2014 Assessment 1: MY ePORTFOLIO PRESENTATION DUE Commencing your feasibility analysis Activities and readings will focus on: • How to structure your Business Concept Plan • Preparing and documenting a feasibility analysis; • Developing narrative paragraphs on individual team member strengths and skills; • Developing annotated bibliographies for team project • Project team meeting to develop feasibility analysis and agree on the processes for finalising plan • Team meetings to discuss the team based project. Refining Aim and Objectives in preparation for Assessment 3A (2) WEEK 6: commencing 1st of September 2014 Assessment 3A: (2) ORAL PROJECT REPORT DUE Continuing your feasibility analysis Activities and readings will focus on: • Assessment 3A (2) 5 min Oral Project report. • How to conduct a SWOT analysis – identify key issues emanating from SWOT • How to conduct a market analysis as part of your feasibility analysis • Financial projections – researching and estimating income and costs • Project team meetings to continue your feasibility analysis for your business proposal WEEK 7: commencing 8th of September 2014 Preparing to present your business plans Starting the business plan Activities and readings will focus on: • Writing a convincing executive summary • What makes a good business proposal presentation; preparing for your presentation • Structuring your project plan • Finding and using project planning resources • Project team meeting – finalising your business concept presentation BFP2100_S2_2014_Unit_Guide_Sydney_3July2014.doc 10 WEEK 8: commencing 15th of September 2014 Assessment 2A: BUSINESS CONCEPT PROPOSAL DUE Assessment 2B: BUSINESS CONCEPT PRESENTATION DUE Scoping your project plan After the presentations, activities and readings will focus on: • Scoping your project plan; setting measurable objectives using the program logic model • Undertaking stakeholder analysis • Identifying legal and ethical constraints and issues • Project team meeting. Preparation for Assessment 3A (3). WEEK 9: commencing 22nd of September 2014 Assessment 3A: (3) ORAL PROJECT REPORT DUE Getting down to the nitty gritty – Scheduling and Resources Activities and readings will focus on: • Assessment 3A (3) 5 min Oral Project report. • Scheduling: developing a list of tasks and a Gantt Chart • Understanding what drives the use and cost of resources • Identifying and costing resources; preparing to develop a budget • Project team meetings to develop schedule and cost resources • Preparation for Assessment 3A (4). WEEK 10: commencing 29th of September 2014 Assessment 3A: (4) ORAL PROJECT REPORT DUE From resources to the budget Risk management Activities and readings will focus on: • Assessment 3A (4) 5 min Oral Project report. • Developing the budget for your project • Identifying and quantifying risks and developing a risk management plan • Team meetings to discuss requirements for submission of project plan WEEK 11: commencing 6th of October 2014 Putting it all together Activities and readings will focus on: • Project meeting to review document and identify gaps and processes for finalisation and proof reading • Project meeting to review performance and prepare team reflection for Appendix 2 • Preparation for Assessment 3A (5), based on team reflection for Appendix 2 WEEK 12: commencing 13th of October 2014 Assessment 3A: (5) ORAL PROJECT REPORT DUE Assessment 3B: BUSINESS PLAN DUE Review and Preparation for PD3 Activities and readings will focus on: • Assessment 3A (5) 5 min Oral Project report. • Preparation for PD3 BFP2100_S2_2014_Unit_Guide_Sydney_3July2014.doc 11 • Networking and relationship building • Reviewing what you learned in PD2: Subject and Teacher Evaluations ENJOY YOUR BREAK DETAIL OF THE ASSESSMENT TASKS ARE ON THE FOLLOWING PAGES BFP2100_S2_2014_Unit_Guide_Sydney_3July2014.doc 12 BFP2100 Professional Development 2 Assessment 1: My ePortfolio presentation 30% (INDIVIDUAL ASSESSMENT) DUE – WEEK 5 (My ePortfolio shared with your lecturer in week 5) This is an individual assessment task. An increasing trend in the employment market is the use of social media and networking to connect interested employment candidates with potential employers. Internet based networking sites such as ‘Linked-In’, ‘on-line video resumes’, and ‘personal websites’ are some methods that are currently being used to showcase and publicly communicate the capabilities and interests of people in the employment market. Another example of electronic media that is used to potentially showcase a person’s interests, skills, abilities and potential for a chosen profession or field is ePortfolio presentation. A My ePortfolio presentation is a collection of evidence that documents and displays your academic, employment, co-curricula and personal experience, interests and capabilities. It is an evolving portfolio of information that you can continue to develop and update over the course of your studies and beyond. You can also create & use different ePortfolios for different purposes (e.g. ePortfolio presentation for applying for different types of jobs highlighting different skills or abilities; ePortfolio presentation of achievements; ePortfolio presentation of learning experiences etc.). For this assessment, you are required to individually develop My ePortfolio presentation through ‘VU Collaborate’ (or another ePortfolio platform approved by your lecturer) to assist with achieving your first career step following graduation. The purpose of this activity is to: • encourage you to reflect on your academic learning, life experience, strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and strengths in relation to your to your future career prospects and choice(s); • document and evidence the learning, skills and experiences that best represents who you are and what you can do; • develop comprehensive Career SWOT Analysis and Career Plan that will assist students in their future personal and professional growth; • It is strongly recommended you review the guidelines and examples at Penn State or other sites you can find via your own searches, which provide useful ideas for what could be included in your ePortfolio presentation and how it might be structured. Guidelines & Specific Requirements….. You will develop ePortfolio presentation to support your application for your first career step following graduation from your current study (Use actual realistic detail to date of your studies, skill sets, work experience, and personal achievements). Remember your audience are potential employers and professional connections – not necessarily your facebook friends or even your teachers. So choose examples and photos that are more likely to catch the attention of employers / professional connections. Then try to be specific and focus on what potential employers and professional connections might want to read about you, what you have done and learned, who you are and what you can do (your attitudes, skills, abilities and personal strengths), and what you would like to do (career and life goals). In the better ePortfolio presentations people do not just describe what they have done, but explain how they have developed their skills and attitudes in the process and use evidence (photos, documents, other media) to provide a clear picture of who they are and what they can do and what they aspire to. BFP2100_S2_2014_Unit_Guide_Sydney_3July2014.doc 13 You have a great deal of creative freedom to structure your ePortfolio presentation however you like, but your ePortfolio must at least contain a number of pages which cover the following areas as a minimum. – A “professional looking” introductory page with a well-chosen photo and some introductory information about you and your career aspirations. Your aim in creating this page is to make a potential employer want to click on your other pages to find out more about you. – Several pages which provide examples and evidence of your academic, employment, co-curricular and personal experiences and what you learned from them and what skills, attitudes you developed from them. – One page containing your personal career SWOT analysis. – One page containing your CV – One page containing your detailed Career Plan, including long term and short term career objectives which are specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and time based (SMART). Your career plan should include a number of specific steps or actions that you could take that would help you achieve your short and long term career goals. Note that even if you provide access to your SWOT analysis and/or your Career Plan and/or your CV on a Word or PDF file, the contents MUST still be copied, pasted and formatted as a page of your ePortfolio presentation as well, as downloading these documents is inconvenient and may take too long for users of your ePortfolio, including potential employers. As a minimum your ePortfolio presentation must contain at least 8 examples or evidence relating to your past and present experiences, with an appropriate mix of academic, co-curricula, employment, and personal examples. (Note that a good ePortfolio presentation would be expected to have several examples within each category. Depending on your individual experiences and preferences you may have fewer examples in one category and more in others). • Academic examples could include: o Relevant photos, documents or other media that can provide evidence of learning achievements from your prior studies or current studies and that might be relevant to show your capabilities especially in relation to your likely career path. o Displays of well-chosen examples of assignments or assessments done successfully in past or current units of study; o Evidence of results, certificates of achievement, letters of commendation, etc. o Evidence of specific skills or knowledge you have you have obtained from your academic studies. o Evidence and examples of skill sets achieved from your past and current academic studies. • Employment examples could include: o Relevant photos, other media, awards, achievements related to your employment or place of work; o Copies of letters of commendation, testimonials or references o A summary of skill sets or examples of skills you learned or used in your employment • Co-curricular examples could include: o Relevant photos, other media, awards, achievements, letters of commendation, references or other evidence related to your sporting, community or volunteering activities associated with co-curricular activities at school, college or university; o A summary of skillsets and examples of what you learned in co-curricular activities. • Personal examples could include: o Relevant photos or other media, documents, personal referee statements or other evidence about personal activities outside of university or school that can be used to demonstrate how you have developed your skills, abilities or attitudes. – e.g. evidence of you learning a language or a musical instrument, playing in a band, volunteering or involvement in community groups or other personal development activities or recreational activities outside university; a recent photo of you receiving an BFP2100_S2_2014_Unit_Guide_Sydney_3July2014.doc 14 award or involved in sport or other activities with a reflective comment about your achievements or what you gained from the experience; or examples of personal development – e.g. photos or evidence of your art work, sporting or other personal activities that you can relate to your personal or professional development, career or life goals or interests. You should always explain how photographs or other evidence relate to your personal or professional development, career or life goals or interests. Many students find it useful to use the STAR method (Situation – Task – Activity – Result) to help them analyse and describe the impact of their experiences. You should remember the audience is a POTENTIAL EMPLOYER – NOT your Facebook friends or even your lecturer. Your presentation and expression should be tailored accordingly! Career SWOT Analysis Your Career SWOT analysis should be on a page of your ePortfolio presentation (NOT a downloadable file) and should carefully identify and present your strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats in relation to your future career choices, as well as providing a list of Actions to incorporate in my career plan based on your SWOT analysis: The list of specific actions to incorporate in your career plan should be in two parts: • Actions to build on your strengths and exploit opportunities; • Actions to address your weaknesses and respond to and minimise the impact of potential threats. The strengths you list in your Career SWOT analysis should be highlighted and supported with evidence in your ePortfolio pages. Your list of actions should be used to inform the development of your career plan. Career Plan Your career plan should be on a page of your ePortfolio presentation (NOT a downloadable file) and show your short and long term career goals and life goals, as well as providing a career plan showing specific objectives in relation to the steps you could take to help you to get to where you would like to be. It should provide a plan of relevant actions that clearly connect to and compliment your career direction. These goals and activities should be achievement-oriented and outcome-focussed and meet the SMART criteria. Curriculum Vitae (CV) Your CV should be on a page of your ePortfolio presentation (NOT a downloadable file) and should be based on a recognised acceptable format from ‘VU Collaborate’ or Career websites and should be the equivalent of two A4 pages. This should be created in two forms: one as a page in your ePortfolio presentation and one as a Microsoft Word document as this is the most common program used by employers / recruitment agencies. Refer to the Careers Unit for advice and templates. CVs should be the equivalent of two A4 pages and are to be professionally presented, current and relevant to the chosen industry or profession of interest. It is strongly recommended that students seek additional feedback and advice relating to the development of their CV from sources outside of the classroom – for example VU Careers Unit, VU Work Integrated Learning (if enrolled for placement), or personal industry sources and connections. Refer to links & information in ‘VU Collaborate’ – week 2 for advice on how to do a CV. Your CV must contain the full URL address for My ePortfolio presentation. A final note: Your ePortfolio presentation, CV and career plan should be strategic and should be informed by your career SWOT analysis: Your CV and the examples of evidence in your ePortfolio presentation should clearly demonstrate your desire to achieve your goals and should compliment your career direction as indicated in your career plan. BFP2100_S2_2014_Unit_Guide_Sydney_3July2014.doc 15 Submission requirements… Before submitting 2 components of this assignment please ensure that both, CV and ePortfolio presentation are named as: ‘VUStudent ID_FirstName_LastName’ (both files must be named exactly the same). 1. In accordance with the College of Business guidelines, mandatory submission of your CV through ‘VU Collaborate’: Assessment Dropbox: Assignment 1 – My ePortfolio by the end of week 5 (29th of August 2014, Friday 5pm). This process will automatically submit your assignment through Turnitin. 2. Share your ePortfolio presentation with Dr Samuel Belicka through My ePortfolio/ Sharing Groups Facility by the end of week 5 (29th of August 2014, Friday 5pm) as per the steps below: • On the right hand side of your ePortfolio presentation’s name is a ‘down-arrow’. Click on that; then click ‘Share’ • Tick box for ‘Anyone with the URL below can access this item’; • For the ‘Presentation Visibility’ leave everything as per default (which is ‘Always Visible’); • Click ‘Add Users and Groups’; Type in the ‘search box’ the name of the person with whom you are

 

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